Animalcouriers is helping transport ophaned badgers from Wildlife Aid in Leatherhead, Surrey, to a new purpose-built home in a secret Surrey location.

The six orphaned badger cubs came from a variety of locations in SE England. They’ve spent several months at Wildlife Aid’s excellent holding facility, where they’ve been integrated into a single social group. Their large number means they will be released in three groups, and Animalcouriers will be sponsoring all the transport requirements. The first group has already been released, the next one will go over the coming days, and the final group will be released in early November.

Badgers become orphans for a variety of reasons, but usually because the mother is killed in a road traffic accident. When the young badgers go looking for their missing mother, they become disorientated and end up in situations where they need to be rescued.

Both East and West Surrey Badger Groups have been involved in building artificial badger setts. These take about six full days to build. Tunnels are dug out and pipes are laid to provide underground corridors, with the ends of the pipes providing sleeping chambers (bedrooms to you and me), to give the badgers a good start, as up to now they have been nurtured and looked after. Once established, the entire group will continue to expand and develop the sett.

In the photo of the artificial sett, what looks like a chimney in the middle provides ventilation and also cabling access for an underground camera. The badgers can be seen entering the sett and going down the tubes to the chamber areas. Viewers of the Animal Planet Channel will be able to see the film and chart the progress of this group as they grow up.

We all wish these orphans a happy life in their new home, and very much look forward to the next two releases.

East Surrey Badger Group members carry the two badger cubs to their new home

The box is opened

Sniffing the air before entering the sett

Their new home